Posts

Europe’s Most Congested Cities

In the last blog article, we reviewed North America’s Most Congested Cities. Although Canada and the US are one of the largest countries in the world, Europe has a larger population and population density. North America has a population of approximately 529 million and population density around 32 people per km. Europe is less than half the size and has a population of about 738 million and population density of approximately 72.5 people per km.

Countries across Europe have a longer history and established infrastructure earlier on. European congestion is ranked at 24%, which is 4% higher than in North America.

In this week’s blog article, we will be reviewing the most congested European cities according to GPS manufacturer, TomTom.

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Top 5 Reasons to Automate Your Spring Counts

Spring is officially upon us and transportation professionals are in the midst of kicking off the traffic count season. Last week’s blog, Top 3 Traffic Data Projects to Start Off Your Spring Count Season, focused on maximizing your traffic data collection efforts amongst three transportation projects.

This week, we’ll focus on why many transportation professionals are now automating their traffic studies. The start of a new year provides a great time to step up your traffic data collection efforts and leave the manual counters in the dust.

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Urban Congestion Impacts and Improvements

The US Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) released their annual Urban Congestion Trends for 2010, which shows an increase in congestion and traffic levels overall within US urban cities. Twenty cities are measured annually and the latest report shows an 18 minute increase in daily delays from 4:20 to 4:38. Congestion levels have been steadily increasing since 2008 when levels dropped due to the downturn in the economy. However, they haven’t reached the levels previously seen prior to the recession in 2007.

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Reducing Crashes on Urban Arterial Roads – Part 2

Last week’s blog article was the first half of a two part blog exploring how arterial roads can be improved to reduce crashes from a traffic engineer’s perspective. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), crashes on arterial roads are becoming exceeding serious due to the frequency of travel and because many urban arterial roads weren’t designed to accommodate the current vehicle capacity within the USA.

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Reducing Crashes on Urban Arterial Roads

Although fatal crashes are more likely to occur on rural arterial roads, most occur on urban streets due to the sheer volume and frequency of traffic. This week’s blog will be a ‘two parter’, exploring how arterial roads can be improved to reduce crashes from a traffic engineer’s perspective.

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The State of America’s Transportation Network

The American transportation network is in dire need of highway maintenance and reconstruction. Valued at $1.75 trillion, it has endured years of wear and tear, increased traffic, inconsistent maintenance and varying weather conditions. All of these variables, along with higher construction costs and reduced government funding have contributed to only half of the nation’s roads being in good condition.

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Roundabout Safety Improvements

Roundabouts are becoming more common in urban areas and with good reason. They are known to improve traffic flow and safety in comparison to other forms of intersection control such as traffic signals. However, problems can arise from using roundabouts since traffic signals and signs have been the standard for so long. Understanding how to best optimize roundabouts and prevent accidents will ensure that traffic flow is being optimized.

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7 Billion People – Can the World’s Roads Support This Population?

In the past month, the world’s population surpassed 7 billion people. Celebrations were underway to commemorate this new height in population, however, what are the impacts on the world’s infrastructure?

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