Posts

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) in the United States

Last week’s blog was on the topic of the potential new bus lanes in India, specifically Bus Rapid Transit (BRT). These types of bus lanes are scattered throughout the United States including in New York City, Boston and Phoenix. Most recently, the US Federal Government gave the green light for BRT funding in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

 

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Traffic Congestion: 180 km Traffic Jams in Sao Paulo

We previously covered traffic congestion across the United States, in Europe and in China. Residents of these areas have experienced the joy of traffic congestion that stretches many kilometers and increases their daily commute time substantially. Sao Paulo in Brazil is no exception.

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Europe’s Most Congested Cities

In the last blog article, we reviewed North America’s Most Congested Cities. Although Canada and the US are one of the largest countries in the world, Europe has a larger population and population density. North America has a population of approximately 529 million and population density around 32 people per km. Europe is less than half the size and has a population of about 738 million and population density of approximately 72.5 people per km.

Countries across Europe have a longer history and established infrastructure earlier on. European congestion is ranked at 24%, which is 4% higher than in North America.

In this week’s blog article, we will be reviewing the most congested European cities according to GPS manufacturer, TomTom.

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North America’s Most Congested Cities

With population growth on the rise, many urban areas are growing faster than their city’s infrastructure and transportation networks. Last year the world’s population exceeded seven billion people and many large cities are already encountering overcrowding on public transit, increased pollution levels, and longer traffic delays.

The GPS manufacturer, Tom Tom, published its latest Congestion Index, which measures congestion as a percentage difference when compared to free-flow traffic.  This percentage indicates how much longer it will take to travel through the city with the normal amount of traffic than if there were no vehicles or congestion on the road.

North American congestion is rated at 20%. This week, we’ll review the top 5 congested cities in North America.

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Traffic Data Collection at the Green Living Show 2012

This past weekend Miovision attended the Green Living show at the Direct Energy Centre in Toronto, Ontario. This is one of North America’s largest green living consumer events and attracts over 400 exhibitors and 30,000 individuals over three days. It features a wide range of different green products and services, such as transportation, food, green building, eco-tourism and fashion.

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Faulty Traffic Data Used in Northern Virginia BRAC

A couple of weeks ago, I posted a blog article entitled, Top 5 Reasons to Automate Your Spring Counts, which briefly covered the use of faulty data in Northern Virginia and the importance of accurate traffic data collection. This started a number of discussions about traffic data accuracy and the consequences for cutting corners, so I decided to dedicate this week’s blog to this occurrence.

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Urban Congestion Impacts and Improvements

The US Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) released their annual Urban Congestion Trends for 2010, which shows an increase in congestion and traffic levels overall within US urban cities. Twenty cities are measured annually and the latest report shows an 18 minute increase in daily delays from 4:20 to 4:38. Congestion levels have been steadily increasing since 2008 when levels dropped due to the downturn in the economy. However, they haven’t reached the levels previously seen prior to the recession in 2007.

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7 Billion People – Can the World’s Roads Support This Population?

In the past month, the world’s population surpassed 7 billion people. Celebrations were underway to commemorate this new height in population, however, what are the impacts on the world’s infrastructure?

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